About your Search

20121111
20121111
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
the tea party and the future of the republican party. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. i'm happy to be here. host: we've got an article here from the "christian science monitor" with the headline, "will the tea party compromise"" he writes, tea partiers may be more amenable to an agreement on tax revenues now that the electorate has signaled it doesn't especially like what the tea party has been up to. he goes on to say, if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, said speaker john boehner on yesterday, it's a mandate to find a way for us to work together. republicans, he said, are willing to accept new revenue under the right conditions to get a bipartisan agreement over the budget. your thoughts about what robert reich had to say and what the speaker is saying. guest: well, you know, i think that we need to find some common ground. obviously we're facing this fiscal cliff, so we have to find some common ground. everybody's talking about revenue, nobody's talking about cutting. that's really what we need to be focusing on, because you can tax people int
. this is "your money." the elections are over. the american people have spoken. now it's time for washington to get to work. >> you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. >> that's because nothing is more important to our economic recovery than creating jobs. president obama says he'll add 12 million jobs over the next four years. but for his math to work, the pace of economic growth needs to pick up. with a crisis in europe and a slowdown in asia, an economic storm beyond our control stands ready to batter our shores. still, two years of consistent job growth prove we are heading in the right direction, but the fiscal cliff is one storm that will be of our own making unless washington acts. $7 trillion in across-the-board tax hikes and spending cuts over the next decade mandated to begin in january. it's the legislative equivalent of a slow motion train wreck that washington can avoid. the question? will congress and the president drive that train over a cliff? >> we won't solve the problem of our fiscal imbalance overnight. >> the elections are over. the threats to our economy are not
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
veterans remembrance ceremony. >> as washington likes are against this grover norquist. they are noted for the anti-tax plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from politico and russell berman from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-clas
, not a word we hear often in washington. if there is compromise to avoid this fiscal cliff, where does it come? john boehner indicated, revenue is possible, but we're not raising tax rates. where is there compromise? >> i think where there's going to be a compromise on taxes, this be would be a good thing on the economy, might exchange lower tax rates in return for a reduction in all the loopholes that as it is distort economic activity. so if boehner were able to achieve that kind of compromise, that's one that the republicans could be pleased with. the bush tax cuts are gone, they're expiring, and the president said that 250,000 below, he wants that extended, but for those making more than 250, will the bush tax cuts come to an end? >> i don't think so. i think actually the they won't come to an end because the democrats don't want major reduction in spending, if you hit the cliff, the spending would go down and politicians love to spend money. an extension of the bush tax cuts, less we're blessed by the relatively few, jeff baso, the late steve jobs, you want to remove the barriers to their
decided kind of individually. i read the numbers of the status crowe, but i think the those in washington is very different, that a rising republican tide was turned back. democrats are more firmly in control. lessons have been learned from the first four years, maybe. no more mr. nice guy. >> can you expand on that in the fiscal clip and some of the policies? >> i want to look ahead to the future. i do not have a good clear crystal ball here. i think these are all things to be determined. the barack obama reach out to republicans? starting with romney, but really the leadership and some of the key players whom he might be able to work with in a bipartisan way, say john mccain. there are house members and senators. does he reach out? secondly, legislation. does the government from the center out? does the governor from the base over to try to get a majority? on the republican side, how do they respond if obama reaches out? i think he will realize with the the test booklet facing us that he has to do something. how do republicans respond not have as much mcconnell responded? -- how do repu
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)